About

Emma Johnsey

Diploma in Counselling

 

Emma is a Mental Health Specialist for HHPDA www.hhpda.co.uk/about-us she has lived experience of Depression, Anxiety and Addiction. Emma has found healing through her therapeutic journey and along the way, she has fallen in love with the EAGALA model, in which horses help individuals, find their solutions. Emma has a passion to support others on their healing journey.   

She is a qualified counsellor and has been in practice for over thirteen years. She has worked in a variety of support and managerial roles for various charities and delivered counselling in the NHS.

 

Alongside this, she has developed a private practice where she delivers online, face to face and talk and walks in nature (ecotherapy). Emma has also studied psychology, philosophy and nursing.  She has specialised in areas such as trauma, addiction, self-harm and sexual violence. 

Although Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) played a central theme in her diploma she would describe herself as an Integrative Counsellor. Adapting the model and using creativity within her work, such as exploration through objects or art.

 

An Integrative Counsellor means that a combination of theories is used, including Person-Centred Therapy and Psychodynamic Counselling to best match the approach to the goal of the work and the person.

Her approach assumes that the quality of the meeting is more important than any technique or theory that is used, and that different issues have meanings particular to the individual. Open communication is the key.

 

She is a Registered Member of the BACP (British Association of Counselling & Psychotherapy) and abides by their Code of Ethics.

For further information, see www.bacp.co.uk/ethical_framework

 

In her personal life, she enjoys all areas of well-being and fitness including weightlifting and mountain biking. Emma is also a qualified Personal Trainer and masseuse.

 

If you would like to chat with Emma about counselling or arrange an appointment, please contact her via the contact page. If counselling turns out not to be appropriate for you, Emma may be able to suggest other forms of help.

 

 

Publications:

Crisis, The Journal of Crisis Intervention and Suicide, 2015, Evaluating the Efficacy of a Helpline From a Service User and Helpline Worker Perspective. Philip Tyson 1, Claire Law 1, Sophie Reed 2, Emma Johnsey 2, Olusola Aruna 3, and Sue Hall 4

http://econtent.hogrefe.com/doi/full/10.1027/0227-5910/a000390

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